A Pre-K through Grade 12 Coordinate School Located in Honolulu

 

Aloha,

The Health Office at St. Andrews Schools is staffed by a registered nurse (R.N.) SAS works diligently to provide a safe and healthy campus for all students.
Why have a nurse at school?
"School nursing is a specialized practice of professional nursing that advances the well-being, academic success, and life-long achievement of students. To that end, school nurses facilitate positive student responses to natural development; promote health and safety; intervene with actual and potential health problems; provide case management services; and actively collaborate with others to build student and family capacity for adaptation, self-management, self-advocacy and learning.” NASN 2010
I am privileged to be the nurse working with your child.
Please feel free to contact me at at 808-532-2403  or email dsherman@standrewsschools.org or attendance@standrewsschools.org (attendance and tardy emails). 

Sincerely,

Deborah Devine-Sherman, R.N.
School Nurse

Information from the Health Office

Important Health Forms

Health Information

Concussion Information
A concussion is a type of brain injury that changes the way the brain normally works. A concussion is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. Concussions can also occur from a fall or blow to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. Even what seems to be a mild bump to the head can be serious. A concussion is caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head. Concussions can also occur from a fall or blow to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. Even what seems to be a mild bump to the head can be serious.
Find information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on concussions here

Measles Information 
Find information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on measles here

Influenza Information 
Find information from the Hawaii Department of Health on influenza here

Head Lice (Ukus)
Find information from the Hawaii Department of Health on head lice here.  

Tobacco, Vaping, and ECig information
Find helpful information at these links:
 
Other helpful links:
 
 
 

Sick Child: Do I send to school or keep home?

Sick children… send to school or stay home?

Deciding when a child is too sick to go to school can be a difficult decision for parents to make. When trying to decide, use the guidelines below and seek the advice of your health care provider.

Go to School
If your child has any of the following symptoms, they should probably go to school:
• Sniffles, a runny nose, and a mild cough without a fever.
• Vague complaints of aches, pains or fatigue.
• A single episode of diarrhea or vomiting without any other complaints.

Stay at Home
If your child has any of the following conditions, please keep your child at home or make appropriate child care arrangements:

Fever
A child must be fever free without fever reducing medication for 24 hours before returning to school. Stay home for a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit or higher within the last 24 hours.

Colds 
Runny nose by itself is not necessarily cause to keep your child home. Keep them home with runny nose AND a fever, bad cough, headache or nausea, or if the child is too tired or too uncomfortable to function at school.

Diarrhea 
Keep children home for three (3) or more watery stools in a 24-hour period, especially if the child acts or looks ill. Persistent diarrhea, especially if accompanied by fever and cramps, should be evaluated by your health care provider.

Ears 
Drainage from the ear and/or ear pain should be evaluated by your health care provider. Untreated ear infections can cause temporary and/or permanent hearing loss.

Eyes
Thick mucus, pus, or clear liquid draining from the eye may be contagious. One or both eyes may also appear extremely red and feel irritated, itchy, or painful. The eyelid may be swollen and the eye may be sensitive to light. Return to school when drainage and symptoms have cleared.

Fractures or Surgery 
Notify the school nurse for evaluation of any modifications to physical activity, length of day, mobility or transportation needs. You may be asked to provide written information from your health care provider regarding limitations and special needs.

Lice
Students may return to school after they have been treated for lice. (See head lice page for more details).

Nasal Discharge (greenish) and/or Chronic Cough
These conditions may be contagious and require treatment. Your child should be seen by your health care provider.

Rash
Any skin rash of unknown cause is considered contagious, especially with fever and itching. To return to school the rash must be gone, or you must present a medical excuse stating that the rash is not contagious.

Sore Throat
A sore throat, especially with fever or swollen glands in the neck may be contagious. If strep throat, the child may return to school after 24 hours of appropriate treatment, if there is no fever, and they feel physically well enough. ​​​​​​

Vomiting 
Anytime a child vomits two (2) or more times, they need to be isolated from other children for 24 hours. If it happens during the night, keep them home the following day.